Marathons in United States

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    Utah Valley Marathon
    Sat 1st Jun
    Free - $175
    5 reviews
    Details

    Utah Valley Marathon

    811 100 W, Provo, UT 84604, USAView event
    5 reviews
    About the event

    Pull on your running shoes for this scenic marathon through Provo Canyon. Named one of the top 10 races in the US, the mostly downhill course is perfect for first-time marathoners and also for runners looking to grab Boston Marathon qualifying times. Come for the tech t-shirt and finisher's medal.

    Reviews
    • Did the event in 2018

      I really really enjoyed this race, it had a lot of unique things that I had not experienced in a race before and of course setting a new half marathon PR after more than 4 years since I had set my previous PR leaves you with really good feelings in regards to a race.I flew in to Salt Lake City on Friday afternoon, got picked up by my cousin at the airport and drove straight to Provo so I could pick up my packet at the EXPO. Plan on at least 45 minutes to an hour to Provo from the airport.EXPO: The expo was quite small and so was the parking lot associated with it, although parking was free. Packet pick up was quick and easy and had several freebies in the bag. Overall nothing special about the expo other than a few booths but it is a small race so it is about what you would expect.T-Shirts/SWAG: The T shirt for this race is a little unique, it had bright red sleeves and a black shirt. The utah valley logo on the front and giant "Pain You Enjoy" letters on the back. I actually like the shirt in the sense that it stands out from the rest of my race shirts but i definitely heard some complaints that people didn't care for it. The race medal was really nice, it is a large spinner medal so the outside of the medal is a solid ring with a disc in the middle that can spin. Another unique addition to my collection, the only negative would be that it doesn't have anywhere to have my name and PR time engraved but I still really like it. Another thing they do that I liked is that the race bib isn't simiply a rectangle. The top of the bib is jagged and has a mountainous design, I have done a few other races that did something unique like this but little touches like this are things that I love about a race.PARKING/ACCESS: This is a point to point course so you park near the finish and take a bus up to the start in the mountains. Parking was at a shopping mall and more than abundant. The buses were easy to find and had plenty of room although I got there pretty early so there wasn't much of a line yet. Once on the bus you drive up a highway into the mountains where they drop you off at the start area. There were plenty of outhouses at the start, especially if you kept walking towards the start line from the drop off area and didn't just stop at the first one you found. One thing to know though is that even during the summer it gets very cold up there at 4:30 am, waiting for the 6am start time. They do however have camp fire barrels set up along the start area to keep warm which I really welcomed. They had a big truck right by the start line to check your bag which really just meant have your bag labeled and throw it in the back of a UPS truck but that did allow you to keep your warm up clothes on until only 10-15 minutes before the race. As for getting back to your car after the race the finish and the parking lot are over a mile apart and while you could walk it they do have buses to get you there which were easy to use.Course/Aid Stations/Elevation: Aid stations were spaced every 2 miles or so throughout the course and were well stocked with water and electrolytes. Because you are running through a canyon there isn't much crowd support during the majority of the course until you get near Provo/the finish but you don't really mind it. The canyon portion of the course is very pretty, there are waterfalls and nice views and while you are running the sun is rising so it only adds to the beauty. As for the elevation I found this to be the easiest elevation race I have ever run. It was almost entirely a very very gentle downhill with only 2 minor uphills. The great part about the downhills was that the gradient was so slight that it helped you keep running fast while never feeling like you were pounding your knees trying to slow yourself down as you would if you were running down a steeper hill. The only reason I didn't rate this as a 1 star elevation difficulty is that all downhill running can be very hard on your quads. I'm sure the people in the full marathon felt it, I didn't have any issues during my race but during the next 1-3 days I thought it was weird that my quads were really sore until I realized that the elevation is what did it. I'm sure some people started to feel it during the race which could at least add a little difficulty. This race is made for you to PR and I managed to finish in 1:29:56 for a PR, finally breaking 1:30.Race Management: I really enjoyed the execution of this race. Bussing to the start was smooth, fires and plenty of bathrooms at the start was great. They have a beautiful downtown finish location by the courthouse after you pass by BYU (the edge of campus so unless you know its there you wouldn't assume it was a university you were passing). They have several other nice touches like a PR gong which you can ring, you tube videos of the finish so that you can see how you finished, and FREE pictures. They had finish time printouts which you could get to show your results.They also had lots of free food at the finish including popsicles and cinnabon. The bag pickup area is a little concerning because they just lay everyones bags out and you just grab yours with no real security but it didn't seem to be an issue.I do want so give one final shoutout to the race management for going above and beyond for me. For the first time in my life I placed in my age group at a race but I didn't realize that they gave awards out all the way to 5th in your age group instead of 3rd so after my wife finished we went home. I later realized that if I had waited around for 15 more minutes I would have recieved by agre group award but by that time I had already flow home to Washington state, after several emails I was able to get a hold of the race director who I offered to send money to in order to ship me my plaque. They said they would figure something out and then shipped it to me for free. I know it only cost them a few dollars but it did take their time and it was just a really nice gesture on their part which I appreciate. I have my eye on this race for future years when I might try to get my full marathon BQ here.
    • Did the event in 2017

      If you're looking for a Utah Race, please come run this one! I flew into SLC and rented a car to make the 45 min drive to Provo, but you could easily fly into the Provo Airport if it was feasible.Expo: Smaller side, but still a good amount of stuff. Since it was a Saturday race, the Expo was 10-9 on Friday. Some running stores and other races to sign up for. Bib Look up could be improved on, as you didn't have a way of looking it up before the expo, so people were crowding around the bib look up table. Flow was otherwise easy to do.Race Day: Saturday, 6 AM start time for the half and the fullTransport to the Start: for the half, buses left from the Provo Town Center. For the full, there was a separate pick up point. Buses for the half ran from 315 AM to 430 AM for a 6 AM start and it took about 20 minutes to get to the half marathon start line. Be sure to have a blanket or sweats or something because it was dark and chilly!At the start: It's the half way point for the full, so plenty of port a potties. Also, fire pits were set up to keep you warm, which was a plus. Bag drop was a truck that took bags to the start, but the guys could have not thrown (literally thrown) everything into the back of the truck. My only wish was that there were buses that ran later to the start (say 5 AM), because waiting for 90 minutes for the start was rough.The Course: Maybe one minor hill for the entire half marathon course. Literally, was all downhill. My first mile was 10:50 only because I had to make a bathroom pit stop and over the course of the race, I was able to make up all the time. The course is very scenic and not a whole lot of spectator support, but I didn't mind surprisingly. Plenty of rock faces, scenery, etc to enjoy! Beware around mile 8 of the half marathon. The 10K joins up here after doing their first mile or so off the main course. We got stuck with some of the back packers and spent time/energy weaving around walkers spread 5 across.Water Stops: Every 2 miles for the first 10 miles and then every mile to the end. Plenty of water and powerade. I just wish that they tables would have been more spread out and a few more at each station because some got crowdedFinish area: PR'ed at 1:55:42. Able to get my medal, water and food fairly easily. I also got to ring the PR bell coming out of the chute. Also was able to do results look up and get a print off of my time. Plenty of vendors, etc. Bag pick up was essentially bags laid out on open grass and you essentially had to find your own bag and hope that no one took it. There were also shuttles back to Provo Town Center, which was where I picked up the shuttle to the start. Definitely a must do race!
    • Did the event in 2017

      I ran the Utah Valley Half Marathon in 2017. I like downhill running, so for me, this was a great race. However, if your knees, hips or other body parts do not like downhill running, I would avoid this race. The grade was not terribly steep but the first 10 miles or so are definitely on a down-hill grade, and on a highway, so the combination of hard surface ad grade can catch some people off-guard.The expo for this race was quiet, did not have a lot of vendors, and so the check-in process was quick.My biggest complaint about this race is that you cannot drive to the start. You drive to the finish and take a bus to the start. The bus drops you at the start more than an hour before the race. It is cold and dark and although there are bonfires and porta-potties, I would have preferred to be in bed that extra hour.Once the race started it was great. The water stations were frequent enough and the volunteers were awesome. About 10 miles into the race, you start to come into Provo, the road is flatter (less downhill) and there is a fair amount of spectator/crowd support.I had a hard time meeting up with family at the finish. It was hard to transition from "runner-only areas to public areas. Also, my gear drop bag from the start had the tag ripped off so it took a good 30 minutes to locate my bag with my sweats and jacket inside. But we did find it, so in the end all was good. The finisher medal was cool, and the race jacket was nice. Also, all finishers received a gift certificate toward a purchase at a local jeweler. I am not local so never used mine but it was a really nice perk.
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    Shoreline Marathon
    Sun 14th Jul
    Ventura, CA, United States
    $45 - $130
    Details

    Shoreline Marathon

    102 Ventura Promenade, Ventura, CA 93001, USAView event
    About the event

    Make the most your Sunday morning and soak up the ocean views in races from 5k up to a marathon. With plenty of flat miles along the coast (plus a couple of moderate hills), this race is ideal for new and experienced runners alike. Don't miss the finisher's t-shirt, medal, free beer and tacos.

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    $64 - $269
    1 review
    Details

    The San Francisco Marathon

    182 Howard St, San Francisco, CA 94105, USAView event
    1 review
    About the event

    Set an early alarm for this bucket list event around SF. Get an all-access pass to the SF sights, including the Golden Gate Bridge and Fisherman's Wharf, and take up the challenge (expect hills - it's SF after all). Come for the finisher's medal and atmosphere of the on-course cheer stations.

    Reviews
    • Did the Half Marathon in 2011

      Great to be able to run over the Golden Gate Bridge!! Good fun but early start.
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    Camarillo Marathon, Half Marathon, 10k & 5k
    Sun 11th Aug
    Sanger, CA, United States
    $45 - $130
    Details

    Camarillo Marathon, Half Marathon, 10k & 5k

    2630 Croydon Drive, Sanger, CA 93657, USAView event
    About the event

    Enjoy the whoops and cheers of the crowd as you take on 4 laps of this well-known course. Flat as a pancake and on entirely paved roads, this is a good one if you're after a PR. And who can say no to the promise of post-race street tacos?

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    Surfers Point Marathon, Half, 10k & 5k
    Sun 10th Nov
    Ventura, CA, United States
    $45 - $130
    4 reviews
    Details

    Surfers Point Marathon, Half, 10k & 5k

    State Beach Access Rd, Ventura, CA 93001, USAView event
    4 reviews
    About the event

    What better way to wrap up the fall running season than with a seaside marathon. This course will appeal to all types of runners, being largely flat and picturesque, with only a few hills to keep you on your toes. Treat yourself to free tacos and beer at the end of the race.

    Reviews
    • Did the Half Marathon in 2018

      It's a good idea to bring your own nutrition. They had water and Gatorade on course but no gels, or snacks.
    • Did the Marathon in 2018

      This course is nice because it is relatively flat, although there are a few minor inclines to test the legs. I ran the marathon and the out and back (x2) format was a little difficult mentally but the cool ocean breeze and the ocean views made for a very nice race.
    • Did the Half Marathon in 2018

      It was pretty much what i was expecting, it was exciting and fun
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    TRI-CITY MEDICAL CENTER CARLSBAD FULL AND HALF MARATHON
    Sun 19th Jan
    Carlsbad, CA, United States
    $40 - $134
    1 review
    Details

    TRI-CITY MEDICAL CENTER CARLSBAD FULL AND HALF MARATHON

    2559 El Camino Real, Carlsbad, CA 92008, USAView event
    1 review
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Tri-city Medical Center Carlsbad Full And Half Marathon is taking place in Carlsbad, California on Sunday, January 20, 2019

    The best and most scenic winter marathon & half marathon with the best swag. Miles and miles of breathtaking ocean views and outstanding course support stations and entertainment at every mile. Turn your Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend into a run-cation!

    Reviews
    • Did the Half Marathon in 2019

      Its my first experience racing here in the west coast, loved it. I plan to run Carlsbad every year now.
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    Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon Race Weekend
    Sat 27th Apr
    Champaign, IL, United States
    $15 - $460
    Details

    Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon Race Weekend

    1800 S 1st St, Champaign, IL 61820, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    The Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon offers a beautiful, scenic tour of the University of Illinois campus, revitalized downtown streets, tree-lined residential neighborhoods, and an awesome paved park trail. Thousands of friendly and fun fans and volunteers from Champaign-Urbana line the course, exuding Midwest hospitality like you have never seen before.

    You will find first-class race shirts, medals, food, and fanfare. Enjoy a spectacular finish at the 50-yard-line of the Universitys historic Memorial Stadium and attend the rocking postrace 27th-Mile Celebrate Victory Bash right outside the stadium. Live music, free beer, interactive booths, bragging rights.

    From the youngest to the oldest, from the slowest to the fastest, from the youth run to the marathon, there is a race for everyone.

    Join us April 26 & 27, 2019 for the Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon Race Weekend! Our mantra is making runners happy, one mile at a time.

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    Sierra Azul Trail Challenge
    Sat 27th Apr
    Los Gatos, CA, United States
    $40 - $95
    Details

    Sierra Azul Trail Challenge

    16845 Hicks Rd, Los Gatos, CA 95032, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Run in the shadow of Mt. Umunhum with the deer and a few of your favorite running pals. Set in the Sierra Azul Open Space Preserve, this one of a kind running event provides unique access to gorgeous trails and scenery not commonly viewed. 100% trail/fire road. One of the toughest runs out there, this 50K challenge course has plenty of steep climbs and exposure to make sure you get a fantastic workout. The 50k course covers the entire park. You will not be disappointed.

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    $57 - $98
    Details

    Western Pacific Marathon

    Fremont, CA, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    All races start and finish in the Quarry Lakes. The marathon, half marathon and 10K have large out-and-back sections on the Alameda Creek Trail. The course is mostly gravel/fire trail with a very small portion of pavement at the beginning and end. Hills are nearly non-existent, so bring on the speed!

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    Home Away From Home 5K/Half Marathon/Marathon
    Sat 27th Apr
    $25
    Details

    Home Away From Home 5K/Half Marathon/Marathon

    Brittonkill Central School, 3992 NY-2, Troy, NY 12180, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Join us in Brunswick, New York, for a scenic 5K, half marathon, or marathon to benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Capital Region. The 5K and half marathons are an out-and-back course. The marathon includes hills and dirt roads and offers beautiful mountain views.

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    Delaware Marathon
    Sun 28th Apr
    Wilmington, DE, United States
    $15 - $140
    Details

    Delaware Marathon

    Harriet Tubman - Thomas Garrett Statue, Tubman, Garrett Riverfront Park, Wilmington, DE 19801, USAView event
    About the event

    Make the most of Spring with the Delaware Marathon running festival. There's a great range of races, from the kids mile up to the marathon. Bring the whole family along and be sure to collect your t-shirt and complimentary post-race beer.

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    Long Island Marathon Weekend
    Sat 4th May
    Westbury, NY, United States
    $12 - $125
    Details

    Long Island Marathon Weekend

    Eisenhower Park, 1899 Park Blvd, Westbury, NY 11590, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    There are few events on this great island that are as iconic and long-standing as the NEFCU Long Island Marathon, which has evolved from a small race that attracted avid runners more than 40 years ago, to a day-long festival for kids, families and the entire community. The first weekend of May has become synonymous with the Marathon, and we are thrilled to be able to help keep this amazing event running for the enjoyment and betterment of all Long Islanders.

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    $12 - $109
    Details

    Long Island Marathon

    E Meadow Dr, Vail, CO 81657, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    The NEFCU Long Island Marathon is one of the regions most exciting athletic events, and I am pleased to team up with Corey Roberts of RACE AWESOME and NEFCU to offer even more to our racegoers, said Nassau County Executive Laura Curran.

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    Publix Florida Marathon
    Sun 2nd Feb
    Melbourne, FL, United States
    $70 - $120
    4 reviews
    Details

    Publix Florida Marathon

    2221 Front St, Melbourne, FL 32901, USAView event
    4 reviews
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Located in Melbourne on Floridas Space Coast, between Miami and Jacksonville, east of Orlando and Tampa, the Publix Florida Marathon & 1/2 Marathon makes for a perfect warm winter running destination for runners of all ages and levels. It is held a month after the Disney Marathon. Like a Rock-n-Roll marathon, our event includes up to 20 musical acts along the course of the half and full marathon and half a dozen on the routes of the 5-k.

    Reviews
    • Did the Publix Florida 1/2 Marathon in 2019

      The best race after Miami Marathon.
    • Did the Publix Florida Marathon in 2019

      It's a good race, well-organized and the scenery is beautiful. I was disappointed this year when we approached atop Eau Gallie bridge and did not see the grand piano with the famous pianist. We cannot blame the race organizer because weather condition on race day was horrible; the pianist would have been soaked and blown away. There is nothing that they could do about the weather. However, one complaint I have is the race photos not being available, it has been three days since the race. Daytona Half Marathon took place on the same day and race photos were immediately available after the race (on the same day) there.
    • Did the Publix Florida 1/2 Marathon in 2019

      A fabulous race on a beautiful course. However, a fellow runner finishing just a minute behind me complained about almost being trumpled at the finish line by racing mascots. I am not sure mascots added much to the experience, definitely not worth stumbling over.
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    Muir Woods Marathon
    Sat 11th May
    Stinson Beach, CA, United States
    $10 - $70
    Details

    Muir Woods Marathon

    Stinson Beach Parking Lot, Stinson Beach, CA 94970, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Challenging hills, paired with stunning views of both the Stinson Beach coastline and the immense, dramatic trees and landscapes of Muir Woods National Monument, await runners at the Muir Woods Marathon, Half Marathon and 7-Mile run, which marks its 31st annual running but makes just its 8th annual running with the 13.1-mile distance this year.

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    $15 - $375
    4 reviews
    Details

    Ogden Marathon

    Ogden, UT, USAView event
    4 reviews
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Held the 3rd Saturday of every May, the Ogden Marathon attracts runners from all 50 states and several countries!

    Reviews
    • Did the event in 2016

      I showed up to the 2016 Ogden Marathon starting line with a little fear and trepidation. The year before, it had rained, boy had it rained. The State of Utah, typically one of the driest in the nation, broke records on marathon weekend for the amount of rain that fell while another record was broken, the largest number of runners during a single day in Utah showed up for the Ogden Marathon, Half Marathon and 5k races. Close to 10,000 to be exact.This morning was supposed to be different. There was only a 20% chance of light rain today. But that 20% quickly changed to 100% as I began to exit the South Fork of the Ogden River and could see what lie ahead. Luckily, the experience last year helped me prepare for any circumstances that would come my way, rain or shine. I have run the Ogden Marathon more than any other. This year admitted me into the famed Ten Year Club and so I wasn't about to drop out for any reason. This is one of my favorite races, the scenery is unmatched in its beauty, the volunteer support rivals that of Boston or LA, and the organizers, The GOAL Foundation, have created an atmosphere of customer service that should be duplicated at other races. The website is a tad click heavy to find what you're looking for, but the registration is straightforward, the Expo is pretty much like Christmas morning for me, and the overall runner experience is phenomenal. I hear the feedback from others about the rain, and yes, it was not the most ideal. But those volunteer aid stations were relentless in their enthusiasm, as if it was still the only option for something to do that day. Forget about the fact that they weren't burning their internal motors down the road to keep warm like the rest of us. They were just as committed as ever. That was the very thing that kept most of us off the rescue buses and on the course. Rain or shine, I will be back for more of the Ogden Marathon. It was, and always will be, the race from which I have more medals than any other.
    • Did the event in 2016

      On Saturday, I ran the Ogden Half Marathon. I was super excited for this race for a number of reasons. This would be my first time running this race, it was supposed to be beautiful, and I was excited to test my last two months of training with my coach. The history of this race the last few years has not been good. It is well known for rain and horrid conditions. I was hopeful that wouldn't happen again, but the weather wasn't looking very promising. There was a good chance of rain and wind. One or the other would be fine, but I wasn't sure about both!Since Ogden is about an hour from my house, and the buses loaded at 5:00 a.m., I stayed in Ogden. My friend and I stayed together, and we went to the expo, which was fun. We went and got some pasta, and then headed back to the hotel to sleep! With my alarm set for 3:15 a.m., I got probably seven hours of restless sleep. The night before race day it is always hard to get great sleep, too many jitters. My alarm went off, and I got up and got myself ready. I normally eat toast for breakfast, but the hotel had a bag breakfast, so I ended up with two chewy chocolate chip granola bars, and a Diet Mountain Dew. I hope my coach isn't reading this... (Insert smiley face!) The hotel was offering shuttles to the start line, so I figured I might as well take advantage of being dropped off, and picked up. (Wait for that part!)I couldn't believe the people at the loading zone. I found a seat on the bus, and at that point it had started sprinkling a little bit. I thought well, if that is all it does, it will be a good race. As we started the ascent up the canyon, it started to rain a bit more. When we arrived at the start line, it started raining cats and dogs! I did bring an umbrella and an emergency blanket, so I thought it would be ok. Thankfully, there was a picnic area that was covered. Nothing like a bunch of runners crammed together under one picnic area. Good thing it was the start of the race and not the end! :)I waited until the very last moment to head to the start line so I wouldn't be super wet, and I kept my emergency blanket over my head through the start to stay as dry as possible. I dressed well, I had three layers on the top, including a wind breaker jacket. I was a bit worried about my head, as I didn't bring a hood or anything to cover it. I had a hat on, but otherwise that was it.As I started down the canyon, the wind went crazy, and the rain came down sideways. It almost felt like hail pelting my face. When I rounded one corner, the wind became so bad I had to hold onto my hat, and I couldn't even hear the music in my ear. When I rounded that corner, you don't even want to know what came out of my mouth! Let's just say the swear words were flying left and right. It might have been comical to have a recording of my voice at that point in time.I was trying to dodge all of the puddles to try and save my feet, but it became pointless to even try. I realized my feet were wet, and I could feel my socks sloshing around with each step. It was at this point, about mile seven, I was trying to figure out how I could get out of the race. I wanted to quit, I was done. My only thought was that I could fake an injury, or I could suck it up and finish. I mean what else could I do? I was stuck in a canyon at least six miles from the finish. The road was closed to traffic, so it isn't like I could call anyone to come and get me, nor could I magically be transported to the finish line! I knew my body could handle it, as my legs didn't feel too bad, but my hands were numb and swollen. I didn't have any gloves, because who needs gloves in May?! Anyway, I figured, I'd made it this far and I was already soaked, so I might as well push on.Push on is what I did. At about mile eleven, I could feel myself getting tired, and my legs were starting to feel a bit cramped. I knew at this point I'd be run walking my way in to the finish, which I was fine with. My dreams of really testing my pacing and training were well gone by this point, and I was afraid to look at my watch too much, as I didn't want it to die from water log! Thankfully I remembered to take a ziplock baggie for my phone, or that would of been toast too. By the grace of god my headphones survived. Jaybird, you did good!It was finally time to make that final turn towards the finish line, but oh lord it looked so far away! My pace slowed considerably the last couple miles, and I just wanted it to be over. Finally, the finish line was in sight, and when I crossed I cannot tell you how happy I was it was finally over! I ended up finishing in 2:37. Not a PR by any means, but given the conditions, I will take it. Half number fourteen is in the books, and it will go down as the hardest craziest race of my life to date!There were volunteers handing out emergency blankets, which I gladly took. I got my medal, and then tried to take stock of how I was. All three top layers were soaked. Let's face, everything I had on was soaked. I told my friend I felt like I was wearing a wet diaper. Yes, I know, TMI. I just can't explain to you how crazy nuts this race was.Due to the weather, the finish line festivities were pretty dismal. I got my drop bag, and my friend and I decided we should figure out how to get the shuttle back to the hotel so we could get some dry clothes and head home! Here is the best part, we call the hotel, and were informed that the hotel was not shuttling people back from the race! WTH!!! Who does that, and doesn't inform the shuttle rider that they can't even get back to their car! We sat in the massage tent, soaking wet, freezing cold, and I actually said, we are going to die here. I am thankful my friend was there at that point, as I might of sat in that tent and started to cry in denial. She got me up, and said lets go find somewhere we can get a cab. We had now not been running for at least 10 to 15 minutes, so of course we were really starting to feel cold. We ended up at a nearby hotel, and they called us a cab. Thank you to the nice front desk person for letting us take shelter in your hotel! We finally got a cab, and ended up making it back to the hotel. Dry clothes never felt so good!I have never run in such conditions in my life, and honestly, never want to again. A big thank you to all the volunteers who braved the elements on purpose to help us out. Also, a big thank you to our emergency responders and police men and women who were there to help out as well. And finally, to my fellow runners who ran this brutal race, congratulations for getting out there. You all deserve a pat on the back no matter what distance you ran. You are all rock stars, and I am happy to call you all friends!Until next time, keep moving my friends!http://runspirationsbymelissa.com/2016/05/22/half-crazy-in-ogden
    • Did the event in 2016

      In 2015 I completed the 5K and in 2016 I decided to up the ante and complete the half marathon. Unfortunately things did not go as planned. I suffered from a foot injury and honestly should have pulled out of this event. I decided to make a go of it, though.We drove up from Vegas the night before and checked into the host hotel. The hotel staff are great, and we had a nice dinner after checking in. I love the rooms, as they are very roomy suites. In the morning, my husband got up and ready a bit before me to catch his shuttle, I did the same once I was up and going. The hotel provided sack breakfasts for the runners, which was nice. Shuttle organization was great, easy to find where you needed to be and plenty of volunteers to help if there was any confusion. We were shuttled up to the start of the race, where we all exited and tried to stay warm. We waited at a nearby covered seating area while waiting for the start. As with the year before, it started raining and it was fairly cold. I didn't worry about it, though, as I figured I would keep warm by moving along the course. I started out with the crowd and within the first quarter mile, I knew I should have bailed out of the race. The pain was so intense, I knew I had to pull out for my very first DNF. I made it to the first aid station, which was just over a mile past the half marathon start. I checked in with the volunteers and they radioed right away that an injured runner needed to catch the SAG wagon to the finish. It started raining harder, it was cold, and the winds picked up. At first, I wasn't in a rush to get picked up because I knew the Marathon had just started and the course might not be clear enough. I waited. And waited. And waited..... aaaaand waited. I stood at the aid station, exposed to the elements, and listened to the radio chatter as they were receiving updates. We were told multiple times that the aid station I was at was next. That they were 10 minutes away. That they would be "right there". The volunteers at the aid station were all extremely helpful and cheery, even with the weather, and they did their best to care for everyone. At one point I was so cold, I could not control the convulsions which were nearly bringing me down, very literally. The volunteers who were running the radio were afraid I was going to fall into their heater and burn myself and they put me in their vehicle with the heat on. After a little while, more and more marathon runners were passing. As one of the volunteers sat with me for a moment, I noticed a guy on course who was very visibly in distress. I commented about him and the volunteer immediately went to talk to him. He opted to drop from the race and was put into the vehicle with me. A short time later, another runner was put into the vehicle. Both of the other runners could not stop shaking and it was pretty evident the 3rd runner needed more help than what was available at the aid station. We still waited. The race was cold last year, and has been cold with multiple DNF's previous years as well. I would think that with that kind of history, there would have been more preparation and coordination for those who needed to drop. I am a SLOW walk-runner. It takes me an average of 3 hours to finish a half marathon. I could have finished my race with time to spare in the amount of time it took the SAG wagon (which was one of the shuttle busses) to come pick us up. We then had to continue the rest of the course watching all the other runners (in the improved weather, by that time of day). After we were dropped off at the finish, I went to the park where the finishing event was being held and waited a short time for my husband to finish the Marathon. We then made our way to gear check so he could grab his things and we went to the hotel to warm up, which took hours. Honestly, I was likely nearly hypothermic while waiting to be brought back to the finish - which, we were told there would be "plenty of rides available". I did not see a single bus or other race vehicle picking anyone up AT ALL. As much as I wanted to really enjoy this race, I couldn't. Not just because I had to DNF, but because it was so poorly coordinated once the weather turned and people needed assistance. I wasn't in danger from my injury, but being out in the elements and waiting over 3 and a half HOURS put my health at risk. Oh, and did I mention I was 18 weeks pregnant at the time? Cause I mentioned it to the race staff, they were fully aware the entire time. I can't honestly recommend this race to anyone who isn't interested in being miserable, extremely cold, and risking the additional suffering if they have to drop the course.
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    Surfer's Path Marathon
    Sun 19th May
    California, CA, United States
    $95 - $135
    1 review
    Details

    Surfer's Path Marathon

    Monterey Bay, Monterey Bay, California, USAView event
    1 review
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Welcome to the Surfers Path Marathon, Capitola Half Marathon & Relay events. The crowning jewel of the Golden State, Santa Cruz County welcomes runners with an enchanting blend of nostalgia, natural beauty and invigorating activities. Whether you choose the 26.2 mile Marathon, 13.1 mile Half Marathon or Relay, you will be treated to scenic courses, featuring breathtaking views of the Monterey Bay coastline and a series of world renowned surf breaks. An ideal destination event, participants can experience a quintessential California vacation. Create a memory that you will treasure forever by achieving your athletic goal in this picture postcard setting.

    Reviews
    • Did the event in 2015

      This was a great race. It was my first marathon and everything went really well. There's no big hills, but be prepared for long inclines. Things I liked:
      The start and finish are at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk. You finish on the beach next to the boardwalk. Since the finish was on the beach, my wife and son had something to do while waiting for me, plus the quick dip in the ocean was just the ice bath I needed. You have ocean views through most of the race. There's plenty of affordable hotels in the area. Things that could have been better:
      There was a lack of real food at the aid stations. There was water, Gatorade, and gels. It's a road race but there were a few miles on a dirt trail.
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    NJ Trail Spring Series 1
    Sun 2nd Jun
    Mountainside, NJ, United States
    $35 - $85
    Details

    NJ Trail Spring Series 1

    Mountainside, NJ 07092, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Join us on June 2, 2019 for a run through beautiful Watchung Reservation in north-central NJ.

    There are four options: 10K, Half Marathon, Marathon or 50K.

    ALL distances follow the same course - PINK Trail a 6+ mile loop also some of the White Sierra Trail because of washout (+/- a few ft, your GPS may vary) also called the History Trail.

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    $51 - $120
    Details

    Rock ‘N’ Roll Seattle

    Fourth and Madison Building, 909 5th Ave, Seattle, WA 98164, USAView event
    About the event

    Race through Seattle's tree-lined streets and take in the city skyline in the Rock 'n' Roll running and music festival. What's not to like, with live music galore and vocal supporters all the way along the course. Come along for the bespoke finisher's medal and post-race parties.

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    $25 - $35
    Details

    Rockin’ the Beach

    5415 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90803, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    The course follows part of the Long Beach Marathon course along the scenic beach path with ocean breezes and beautiful views. The beach restrooms open at sunrise and there are plenty of drinking fountains along the course. There will be a fully stocked aid station at the start area, with Gatorade, water, bananas, chips, cookies, and more.

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    Round The Rock Ultra
    Sat 3rd Aug
    Merrick, NY, United States
    $40 - $150
    Details

    Round The Rock Ultra

    1701 Merrick Rd, Merrick, NY 11566, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    The Channel Island's original Ultra Marathon. This ultra marathon will take place at 6am around the Island of Jersey, Channel Islands, UK.

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    Rock the Coast Marathon, 3/4, Half, 15K, 10K, 5K
    Sun 11th Aug
    $25 - $35
    Details

    Rock the Coast Marathon, 3/4, Half, 15K, 10K, 5K

    5415 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90803, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    This course follows part of the Long Beach Marathon course along the scenic beach path with ocean breezes and beautiful views. Runners go 3.275 miles on the beach path, then reverse and go back 3.275 miles to the start twice for the half marathon, thrice for the marathon, and four times for the full marathon. For the 15K, runners go out 3.1 miles and back, and then out 1.55 miles and back. For the 10K, runners go out 3.1 miles and back, and for the 5K, runners go out 1.55 miles and back. Beach restrooms open at sunrise. Plenty of drinking fountains along the course.

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    The Santa Rosa Full/Half Marathon & 5K/10K
    Sat 24th Aug
    $135 - $145
    Details

    The Santa Rosa Full/Half Marathon & 5K/10K

    570-598 4th St, Santa Rosa, CA 95401, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    The Santa Rosa Marathon weekend offers over 6,000 runners from across the U.S. and abroad the opportunity to race through the scenic vineyards of the Sonoma County countryside, the City of Santa Rosa, and the Prince Memorial Greenway. Marathon racers also run through the DeLoach Vineyards barrel room a once in a lifetime opportunity. The flat and FAST course is also U.S. Track and Field-sanctioned and certified, and the Marathon is a qualifier for the Boston Marathon.

    The Santa Rosa Marathon is a fast road race course, a Boston Marathon qualifier, and a beautiful destination race in Sonoma County, California.

    In 2018 the Santa Rosa Marathon is celebrating its 10th anniversary and will be marking the occasion with special limited-edition double-spinner medals, race swag and a bottle of DeLoach Vineyards wine for every Marathon and Half Marathon finisher.

    Dont miss out on your chance to participate in this rewarding and fun wine country running event!

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    Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Orange County
    Sat 7th Sep
    $20 - $300
    Details

    Lexus LaceUp Running Series - Orange County

    20 Lake Rd, Irvine, CA 92604, USAView event
    About the event

    Throw yourself into the LaceUp Running Series kick-off celebration. Great for all levels of runner, with an additional kids run too. Come for a shot at a half marathon PR (the course has just 220 feet of elevation) or for the free beer and brunch at the finish line.

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    Holland Haven Marathon
    Sun 8th Sep
    Holland, MI, United States
    $35 - $85
    Details

    Holland Haven Marathon

    150 W 8th St, Holland, MI 49423, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Holland Haven Marathon runners experience the beautiful coast of Lake Michigan - Boston qualifying hopefuls can make the cut only one day before registration opens. The Holland Haven Half Marathon begins at Camp Geneva along the Lake Michigan coastline, and the 8K race is a flat, out-and-back course.

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    Echo Summit Trail Run Challenge
    Sat 14th Sep
    Twin Bridges, CA, United States
    $40
    Details

    Echo Summit Trail Run Challenge

    19920 US-50, Twin Bridges, CA 95735, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    A bathroom is available for the 50Mi, 50k, and 20 mile runners at Lovers Leap Campground. 50 mile runners will pass through twice. Primarily single track trail, some dirt roads, a little pavement,very runnable sections, technical sections, climbs, downhills, great scenery, views, creeks, and lakes.

    13.1Mi, 10 mile out and back.

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    All-Out Fallfest Full Marathon, Half Marathon,10K, 5K & 1Mile
    Sat 21st Sep
    Westminster, CO, United States
    $20 - $100
    Details

    All-Out Fallfest Full Marathon, Half Marathon,10K, 5K & 1Mile

    10170 Church Ranch Way, Westminster, CO 80021, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    One of Colorados favourite trails meets one of its most glorious parks at our 5th annual Fallfest 1M, 5K, 10K, Half & Full Marathon! As courses wind southwest along Big Dry Creek Trail, the remarkable sight of Standley Lake with the Flatirons on the horizon will come into view, then the rustic nature to the northeast will be waiting to greet our marathon athletes. A course thats not too hilly & not too flat makes this the perfect choice for all abilities & preferences, plus along with its Endless Series sidekick in April Beat the Heat, All-Out Multicourse is proud to bring you the one and only groomed trail marathon course in the Denver Metro Area!

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    Amish Country Running Festival
    Sat 28th Sep
    Randolph, NY, United States
    $10 - $80
    Details

    Amish Country Running Festival

    122 Church St, Randolph, NY 14772, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Enjoy this course as it rolls through the largest Old Order Amish Community in the US. You will have breathtaking views from vistas that you wont get anywhere else. You will see working Amish farms, clothes lines full of crisp, clean laundry, the colors of autumn and be greeted by waving Amish families as you run past their homes. Prizes will be handmade items from these amazing artisans. Food, fun and more makes this a great event for all ages and families too.

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    Grand Lake Marathon Full/Half/Relay/5k/Kid’s Run
    Sat 28th Sep
    Celina, OH, United States
    $5 - $180
    Details

    Grand Lake Marathon Full/Half/Relay/5k/Kid’s Run

    8 Lake Shore Dr, Celina, OH 45822, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Join us for the 6th Annual Grand Lake Marathon.

    - A Boston Qualifier Full Marathon Course

    - Flat and Fast course for both half and full marathon.

    - Relay Options for both Half And Full Distances.

    - Circle the Lake for the Full Marathon, Point-to-point race for the Half Marathon.

    - Easy Parking, Free Shuttles, Big Race feel with small-town convenience.

    - Affordable Registration Costs.

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    $30 - $110
    Details

    JetBlue Long Beach Marathon

    Renaissance Hotel, Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center, 300 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90802, USAView event
    About the event

    This epic seaside marathon takes place on the picturesque Long Beach. Great for runners of all abilities, the course is completely flat and takes you through downtown Long Beach and along the Pacific beach path. Come along the big finisher’s medal and post-race celebrations.

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    Lexus Lace Up Running Series – Ventura
    Sat 19th Oct
    Ventura, CA, United States
    $20 - $110
    Details

    Lexus Lace Up Running Series – Ventura

    Ventura, CA, USAView event
    About the event

    Soak up the scenes and enjoy the downhills of this Boston qualifier marathon. Great for first-time distance runners and experienced racers, this is the perfect course for a new PR. Come for the the cheery afterparty or to tackle your next running goal.

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    $45 - $260
    Details

    Baltimore Running Festival

    325 W Centre St, Baltimore, MD 21201, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Join us at the event that many are calling one of the best races on the East Coast, NOW FINISHING AT THE INNER HARBOR. With five distances to choose from, and all runners snagging a great Under Armour shirt for participating, this event is for you! You wont want to miss the 19th Baltimore Running Festival!

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    Columbus Marathon
    Sun 20th Oct
    $125 - $145
    12 reviews
    Details

    Columbus Marathon

    Lower Scioto Greenway, Columbus, OH 43215, USAView event
    12 reviews
    About the event
    From the organiser

    The Columbus Marathon is a 501 (C) 3 non-profit organization. We organize, promote and execute the annual Nationwide Childrens Hospital Columbus Marathon & Marathon weekend of activities, which includes 26.2-mile and 13.1-mile races, These events, along with a large health & fitness expo, are held on 20 October 2019.

    Reviews
    • Did the event in 2018

      Great race! Its my local marathon and I love it so much. Its big enough, but small enough. I love that the marathon benefits Children's hospital. Every mile is in our of a child with the exception of mile 11 which is the angel mile. So when you start feel down, or think you can't do it, you think, do it for the kids. The first half has lots of spectators. The back half can be a bit quieter and less spectators. There are a few rollings hills, but not any major climbs.
    • Did the event in 2017

      As I did in 2004, 2015, & 2016 - I returned to downtown Columbus to tackle my "home" race: the Nationwide Children's Hospital Columbus Marathon. As I said last year, this is one of my favorite races and when you look at what goes into this race from all aspects, it isn't hard to see why this is one of the best marathon events in the country. For me this year, the stars had seemingly aligned for what would be a fantastic day, which I'll get to later. Before I get to that part though, here's my overall review of the 2017 Nationwide Children's Hospital Columbus Marathon.COMMUNICATION (leading up to the race): Spot on as always. Darris Blackford (Race Director) and his team are always so great about letting those who have registered know exactly what is going on with events related to the race, how to stay connected, how to help benefit Nationwide Children's Hospital (NCH from this point forward), and so on. The update emails are always well organized and give just enough info to keep one's interest without making you want to hit delete right away. The official Facebook / Twitter / Instagram accounts are also great at providing event information. These are also awesome methods for race organizers to interact with participants by providing answers to FAQ's or simply giving kudos on one's training run. RACE DATE / WEATHER: As always, the NCH Columbus Marathon takes place the 3rd Sunday in October. Normally, this equates to pretty decent weather. This year, however, it was more humid than normal with the threat of some storms moving in during the race. Obviously, organizers can't control or predict the weather, but having this race in October definitely helps manage it!EXPO: Due to construction in the Greater Columbus Convention Center last year, the expo location was moved from where it was in 2015. However, that project has been completed and the expo found its way back to that original location this year. The Battelle Grand Ballroom is, from a logistics perspective, an absolute dream. Official race merch right as you walk in / walk out, vendors of all kinds all across the main level. On the upper level, overlooking all the vendor awesomeness below, runners collect their race collateral (bib, VIP perks, gear bags, t-shirts, etc) in a horseshoe-type setup - up on flight of stairs, loop around the upper level collecting race gear, down the opposite side. This setup makes it very easy to get in, move throughout the expo, get what you need, see what you want (or don't), and head out. PARKING: Personally, I followed the same game plan this year as I did in 2016. Paid ahead for a parking pass for one of the garages near the start/finish line. $30 extra out of pocket, but WELL WORTH IT. Essentially no traffic issues for us the morning of the race (even as we got closer to the start area) and a VERY short walk to the Children's Champion Tent. This paid off later as we had another VERY short walk back to the car after the race and NO traffic issues whatsoever as we left.CHILDREN'S CHAMPIONS: Did I mention that this race directly benefits Nationwide Children's Hospital? One of the biggest ways participants can help - beyond simply registering for the race - is to sign-up to be a Children's Champion as well. Children's Champions are runners & walkers who fundraise for Nationwide Children's Hospital. While there is no minimum fundraising expectation, Children's Champions have the opportunity to earn perks based on how much they raise such as a race-day jersey, custom medal engraving, access to a VIP area pre/post race and more. By the way, the VIP area is pretty cool - free breakfast, massage therapists, post-race lunch, private gear check, etc. While these perks definitely make the race experience enjoyable, raising funds to help children in need makes it incredibly worthwhile. I've had the privilege of being a Children's Champion since 2015 and will continue each year I run the Columbus Marathon!START: The corrals/start line experience is AWESOME. I've been in Corral C all four times I've run this race and I love it. Lots of room to move, PLENTY of porta-johns, great view of downtown Cbus, etc. The build up to the start is also very fun - great deal of music and fireworks that help enhance the positive atmosphere. When you hear "Thunderstruck", you know it's go time!FIRST HALF: During the first mile, runners are still pretty packed together. However, just before the first mile marker, the course widens and you have TONS of room to do whatever you need to do - move over, speed up, slow down, etc. Also, spectators - SPECTATORS EVERYWHERE. If you're looking for a "quiet" race, the first half of the Columbus Marathon is NOT for you. The energy the spectators - casual observers, scheduled entertainment, aid stations, and, most importantly, from the Mile Champions (patients from Nationwide Children's Hospital) - bring to this event is off the charts. Not to mention you get to pass some pretty cool sights - Ohio Statehouse, Franklin Park Conservatory, Drexel Theatre & Capital University, Nationwide Children's Hospital (with a MASSIVE cheer zone!), Katzinger's Deli, German Village, Brewery District, and back to the Ohio Statehouse again before the course split.COURSE SPLIT / SECOND HALF: Just north of the Ohio Statehouse, the half-marathon runners will split off and head back to the finish as the marathoners continue north toward the Arena District (Nationwide Arena, North Market) and Goodale Park, before moving to the campus of The Ohio State University. The crowds slim down a bit during this first part of the second half, but not to worry - they'll pick up again! After traveling north on High St and weaving through the OSU campus, runners do a little jog around Ohio Stadium before heading west into Upper Arlington. The crowds begin to swell again as runners approach mile 18/19, or what I refer to as the "northwest corner" - the farthest point from the start/finish line, before turning sharply south and heading back toward downtown. Runners weave through Upper Arlington and are quickly in Grandview where the crowds are back in full force for the remainder of the race. Mile 20 to the finish is largely regarded as the section where many runners run their fastest 10K of the race. The course takes runners through historic neighborhoods on the north side of downtown and then back through the Arena District before heading back to North Bank Park and the finish. FINISH: Making the final turn onto Long Street and heading to the finish has always been a favorite moment of mine. It's all downhill from that turn with a very slight incline as you come around a curve with .2 to go. The crowds are incredible during the last two miles of the race and are very reminiscent of what crowds were like during the entire first half of the race. A huge big screen and a DJ calling out names await runners as they approach the finish lineMEDAL: Once again, the medal (see attached photo) does not disappoint, capturing the fireworks display from the start of the race. Not the largest medal, but still one of my favorites to earn - and once you've got it, trust me: you've EARNED it. ***
      MY RACE: As I stated at the top, this race had the potential to be something really special. 3 weeks earlier, I had absolutely CRUSHED my marathon PR (4:45) by running a 4:08 at the Akron Marathon. For those who aren't familiar with Ohio geography, Akron has hills - lots of them. By comparison, Columbus is flat - very flat. By following a really great training plan, and crushing a PR on a hilly course, I absolutely thought that breaking 4 hours was in the bag. I THOUGHT WRONG. Maybe 30 minutes before the start of the race, I got a sharp shooting pain in my right shoulder which would have me running very tense (and too fast to compensate) for the first 10k. Not good. Upon arriving near the 14th mile, my body just was not having anything to do with this whole day and I had to begin run/walking. Got to mile 20 and a feeling of nausea was kicking in, but no resolution from it. Mile 24 brought said resolution (read: vomit - sorry, it happens). It just was not my day, but I was still able to finish and snagged a COURSE PR by about 15 minutes. Additionally, my goal for 2017 was to run 1000 miles, which I hit right around mile 18.5. Despite the day not going as planned, I'll take these two little victories and move forward!
      ***The Nationwide Children's Hospital Columbus Marathon is a fast and relatively flat race, great for runners of all skill levels. I've said it before and I'll said it again, Columbus and the surrounding communities are made up of thriving arts districts, green spaces, historic landmarks and amazing local businesses - making Columbus a great place to live, work, play, and visit.
    • Did the event in 2017

      "Can open, worms everywhere!", the immortal words of the Chandler Bing character from "Friends" rings tried and true in so many ways. A little over three weeks after breaking the half marathon seal and my appetite for (self) destruction is on maximum overdrive.After portraying one of the slow methodical zombies from The Walking Dead the last four miles of the Grand Lake Marathon on September 23rd, I was hoping I could scratch the itch of getting more consistent by getting right back into it. No one is looking to be one of those Olympic-caliber speedster living dead folks from 28 Days Later , but I don't want to end up like that damn tortoise whose only recourse to beating the hare is to have a large close-knit family or somehow find the clone generating machine from The Prestige.My impatience led to my signing up for the Nationwide Children's Hospital Columbus Marathon & 1/2 Marathon in an effort to quell my need to replace my lackluster virgin half marathon with a Hugh Hefner-like, been-there-done-that type 13.1 miles. I think what annoyed me most about the first one was that I had training runs where I had ran faster...oh, did I mention I'm a bit competitive? (41 going on 14...that's me)For example, the Friday following the initial half, I ran my own 13.1 route and did it in 1:36:47 (7:22 pace). Not my fastest, but three minutes faster than the race in Celina - ridiculous. Obviously, I have to work on pacing, but I can't help but be overeager...its in my nature. I have been playing with a race split calculator I found online to get a better idea of how NOT to take off like a banshee and finish like an original Keurig machine struggling to push water through pod number 1,000. And actually putting such things into action is whole other story.My attempt to answer to this quandary? ...repeats...of the half-mile and mile variety, as well as progression runs. I've never been one to follow a suggested workout word for word, but I did take pieces of some speed workouts from www.runnersworld.com and mix them in with what I remember from my college running days (holy crap...its been 20 years?!). These are easier said than done, but as long as you aren't passive aggressive about them - and actually do it - you are holding up your end of the bargain.That reminds me - speaking of passive aggressive - my next door neighbors in my building, Bob and his lovely (whack job) wife, apparently have issues with my ability to be...well...you know...human. He has an oxygen tank he has to lug around along with a cane to assist in getting from here to there, I couldn't imagine the struggle he gets to deal with on a daily basis. He does get out quite a bit, just slow and methodically. His wife rarely gets out, but can be heard echoing throughout our building - usually complaining about any and everything described elegantly with clusters of F-word variations. They used to ask for my assistance on a few things and I was happy to oblige. Then, unfortunately, it became an everyday (several times a day) thing. I had somehow become their personal home health aid and (sometimes) bank.To combat this, I started telling them "No" or "I can't". Suddenly, they began to ignore me and I was satisfied with the fact they had picked up on my hints to stop using me as their crutch. Instead of just simply finding other means of assistance, they began to retaliate. Not viciously, but in the way an eight-year old would do so. This included my mail being taken out of my mailbox and thrown on the floor, their Mountain Dew cans tossed into the bushes and garden I maintain (and manicure) for our landlord and cranking up their video games as loud as they can get them....Video games?Yes, this 60-ish couple has grown accustomed to playing Ms. Pac-Man & Pac-Man at all hours of the day with W.J. (whack job) yelling out and referring to the games ghost villains Inky, Blinky, Pinky & Clyde has "bitches" and to Sue as "you stupid whore" when they apparently catch up to her. Now, I can sort of understand this - I, too, was just as into this game at one time. The only difference being I was about seven and it was 1982 (that does not mean finding one of these arcade games around today would require an hour so break in order to pump quarters into it, nostalgia can be a guilty pleasure).I lent Bob a book awhile back, Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential, and it was pseudo returned this last week. And by "returned" I mean tossed within a three foot radius of my door. Not up against my door or in a bag hanging on my doorknob, but in a position like it may have been dropped by a passerby. I guess I should be thankful he had the wherewithal to at least fling toward my apartment.At the moment W.J. and Bob keep taking the floor mat in front of my door. I've found it tossed out our building's front door, laying in the trash, tossed down the basement stairs or it just disappears into oblivion. Since not all of the apartments are occupied, I just replace those that go missing with one of the others. And they, too, will disappear a short time later. I imagine the apartment next door is somehow being insulated by a variety of random floor mats, Art Deco style. Just think of all the cigarettes (yes, she still smokes in their apartment despite Bob's need for oxygen because he simply can't breathe on his own), Totino's Party Pizza and Mountain Dew they could buy if their floor decorating skills became hit?!Moral of the story...say what you mean, do what you say, get things done and speak your mind - don't be a W.J. or oxygen thief.So...attempting to go slower at the beginning of a run takes some getting used to and is awkward to me, but it does feel better speeding up in the middle of each run when you are loose and warmed up. This is easy to do when running alone, but doing it while running with others is hard. A few weeks of playing with progression running (along with reaching the 1,000 mile mark for the year, hitting run number 200 of 2017 and reaching 19,000 feet in total elevation in that time period) had me excited for half marathon part deux.As with the initial 13.1, there would be some exquisite scenery to occupy the eyes. Starting in North Bank Park we maneuver through downtown Columbus to the Ohio State House and head east along historic Route 40 (Broad Street) and into the suburb of Bexley. Then its a slow, methodical u-turn to the right for a return trip west to take us past Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens followed by a jaunt through the Olde Town East neighborhood before heading south to Nationwide Children's Hospital. The group then wraps around the hospital to venture further west into German Village before heading south to circle the cities' second oldest park, Schiller Park. From there it is onto High Street to the west - Columbus' main artery - for a long straight stretch north passing through the Brewery District and downtown (along with passing the Ohio State House a second time) to finish back at North Bank Park in the shadow of Nationwide Arena and Huntington Park. I thought, if I could reach 1:35:00 at minimum (barring any catastrophes), I would be satisfied.Though, as with all races, assumptions and expectations change...and change quickly. Sometimes its the race, sometimes its the week leading up to it and other times - it's both.The weekend before, while on a long run, I felt some tenderness in my right calf. Not too worried about it, I continued on. The very next day, on a short Sunday run, it arrived with full force: a calf strain. I attempted some light running/jogging in the days afterward, but it wouldn't allow for it. All I could do was apply ice to reduce swelling, then heat to keep it loose - and apparently compression is a big key. So I bought calf compression sleeves to at least be more comfortable while on my feet at work, and it was. Still a bit tender (but not quite as painful), I was hoping I could improve before the coming of Sunday's half marathon. With it being Wednesday, I had nearly four full days before the race and wearing the compression sleeve 24/7 with light stretching and ice application ever so often.That night, I had to call the Marion County Court of Common Pleas Jury Duty line to see if my requested civic duty would be needed (I received the notice in the mail the previous week). The automated message indicated the case I was to be associate with would, in fact, be going on.So Thursday morning, I arrive at 8:30 and listen to the bailiff's instructions before being tabbed as juror number 9. We then wait...for two hours. During this time I tried to keep to myself and relax, but Marty would have none of it. Marty, juror number 3, wanted to chat. Ignoring him didn't work, so I entertained his rambling for a few minutes. Come to find out Marty is self-employed and runs a home maintenance business and let us (the jurors) know several times he would be losing $200 a day by having to be there. Oh, and I almost forgot, he has a side business - selling handmade soaps at trade shows and such.I was only casually annoyed, but felt honored that ol' Marty did offer (force upon) his business card before finding another juror to pester. Now nearly 10:30, we finally rise as Judge William R. Finnegan takes a seat. He proceeds to explain his appreciation for our willingness to do our civic duty, but despite the fact we are ready to go...the two sides involved have settled out of court (or just outside of the courtroom that morning, as it would be). So two hours of hanging out at the historic Marion County Courthouse resulted in a $12 jury duty check for having to suffer through Maintenance Marty and a hook-up for my next soap purchase.On Friday - October 13th no less - (two days before half marathon part deux), I had to bite the bullet and attempt to run - even the slightest jog. Not an easy thing to do since, psychologically, I will want to avoid putting pressure on the calf muscle - but I had to rip the band-aid off. So, after work I put it to the test hoping I could get some frame of reference for Sunday. Running on eggs shells I took my sweet time and covered 3.78 miles in 27:58 (7:24). The calf was still a little tender, but I could run with actual form - BOOM! I should be able to do my own thing on Sunday and not attempt to set the world on fire. I did notice, though, I paid 1,000% attention to any, all and every crack, pebble and less-than-smooth surface in my path. I'll be damned if I re-injure myself. With that, I would be idle till Sunday's race and use Saturday to visit the race expo for packet pickup.Arriving prior to sunrise I hangout stretching, warming up and peeing (several times) with the 18,000 half & full marathoners. Being in group "A" meant I had the privilege of starting up front. This meant I got to see the eventual winners for a half-second before they disappeared. We had the fireworks, then the gun and we are off. Not having run a race of this magnitude before, I spent the first quarter mile navigating through the masses of people. Once we reach the larger streets (beginning with High Street), the lanes open up. I take to the outside to give myself room on the turns, as the lemmings tend to cram into one another and stay in the middle.We then turn to the left onto Broad Street and I hug the curve along the pedestrian fencing, but just as I do several spectators are hanging over the fence to gawk and I (unintentionally) bump up against a female spectators arm. She isn't looking anywhere near the course and I'm sure it scared the crap out of her. We hit hard enough that I though I heard my watch turn off. Luckily that was not the case. No one was hurt, but this did end up being a reoccurring theme throughout the race. Several times I would come super close to, or brush up against, spectators stepping onto or leaning into (or standing on) the course. For the love - GET OFF THE COURSE - or just pay attention.After re-gathering my bearings, I find some rhythm. I skip the first water stop because I'm feeling good and at the 7k mark I'm at 29:08. Still a little too fast for my taste, but not crazy fast. I hit all the remaining water stops, essentially swishing Gatorade and spitting it out, then sipping some water and pouring the rest of it down my back. Not familiar with in-race fueling, this was the best way for me to keep from choking or hacking through liquids while running. I haven't passed many people, but have maintained position. Eyeing a few familiar folks near me and just ahead would keep me abreast of where I was in regards to placement.Some fatigue began to set in around mile seven, as some of those familiar folks started to distance themselves. The 3:05:00 marathon pacer (and his followers) slide by me and I smile, thinking you poor bastards, I'M nearly finished. At the 15k time post, I'm at 1:06:50. I'm definitely feeling the fatigue now, but my form is good and my pace is better than I imagined (and better than three weeks ago). Then just after mile 10 (and passing the cheering girlfriend for a second time), my calf reminds me it isn't 100 percent. With Schiller Park just ahead, I feel the pull and then the pain shoot through my leg. "Son of a bitch", is the thought that runs through my head.I slowdown, but keep going with a somewhat exaggerated limp and hoping the pain would subside. A few steps later, I can still feel it but it isn't excruciating and I can still run with some sort of form. Though, I have obviously slowed - and ecstatic I didn't have to come to a complete stop. With a 5k still to go, all I could do was focus on form and attempt to stride. It did, however, suck to watch what seemed like hundreds of folks passing me (that number ended up being 78, but it felt like hundreds).Grinding my way through the remaining two miles and the half/full marathon split, I just wanted to reach the finish. Luckily, it arrives (finally) and I see out of the corner of my eye a time of 1:37: - something or other. And, unlike the last time, I remember to stop my watch. I step across the finish and I'm in a sea of red clad medical personnel. Exhausted, I glance around and they are sort of just standing there. I take a few more steps, glancing around looking for some refreshment and ask, "water...?"I continue dragging my worn out body forward and notice about 10 to 15 yards ahead of me a couple of tables loaded with bottles of water, along with folks handing out finishers medals. I get my medal, guzzle a bottle of water and take another for later, and pose for a couple of exhausted post-race pictures. I'm then handed a plastic bag and walk through the gauntlet of snack stations, it was like a runner's trick-or-treat. I walk out of the participant only area with my medal and plastic bag overflowing with snacks, fruit, protein bars and samples of what not.My official time: 1:37:06 (303rd out of 9,625 finishers, 27th in my age group). Though, the last three mile splits were :30 seconds (or more) slower than the previous ten (7:51, 8:12, 7:49). The calf strain put a dent into the last quarter of my race, but I still finished more than 2:30 faster than my initial half marathon just three weeks before.Two half marathons in three weeks, each under 1:40:00. Hard to complain, but I need to be more consistent. And my half-marathon PR - technically - is still one I ran by myself as practice around Marion (1:36:28). I will be hitting some shorter races in the next few weeks, hoping to keep my enthusiasm above sea level and my right calf from disintegrating.As the holiday season revs it's engine (October through January), Ohio's unpredictable weather will surely follow suit. And like the postal worker, the runner mission hits high gear - Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor grade of incline stays these harriers from the swift completion of their miles on time......or some crap like that - Run On friends!Kaiser Chiefs - RubyLet it never be said
      The Romance is dead
      'Cause there's so little else
      Occupying my headThere is nothing I need
      except the function to breathe
      But I'm not really fussed
      Doesn't matter to meRuby, Ruby, Ruby, Ruby
      Do you, do you, do you, do you
      Know what you're doing, doing, to me
      Ruby, Ruby, Ruby, RubyDue to lack of interest
      Tomorrow is canceled
      Let the clocks be reset
      And the pendulums held'Cause there's nothing at all
      Except the space in-between
      Finding out what you're called
      And repeating your nameRuby, Ruby, Ruby, Ruby
      Do you, do you, do you, do you
      Know what you're doing, doing, to me
      Ruby, Ruby, Ruby, RubyCould it be, could it be
      That you're joking with me?
      And you don't really see you and me [x2]Ruby, Ruby, Ruby, Ruby
      Do you, do you, do you, do you
      Know what you're doing, doing, to me
      Ruby, Ruby, Ruby, Ruby
      Do you, do you, do you, do youKnow what you're doing, doing, to me
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    Ocean State Marathon & Rhode Race
    Sun 27th Oct
    Narragansett, RI, United States
    $25 - $85
    Details

    Ocean State Marathon & Rhode Race

    39 Boston Neck Rd, Narragansett, RI 02882, USAView event
    About the event
    From the organiser

    The 5th Annual Ocean State Rhode Races in Narragansett, RI will be held on Sunday October 27, 2019. Race weekend features a Marathon, the Tufts Health Plan Half Marathon and 5k Race.

    This genuine Rhode Island marathon will showcase what is great about the Ocean State. Not only does the course feature iconic Rhode Island beauty, our post race festival will include an authentic Rhode Island experience at the Narragansett Town Beach.

    The Marathon course is USATF certified and is a Boston Marathon Qualifier

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    TCS New York City Marathon
    Sun 3rd Nov
    Richmond County, NY, United States
    £255 - £358
    20 reviews
    Details

    TCS New York City Marathon

    Battery Rd/Air Force Reserve, Staten Island, NY 10305, USAView event
    20 reviews
    About the event
    From the organiser

    Crossing the TCS New York City Marathon finish line in Central Park is one of the thrills of a lifetime! Check out what you need to know to have a safe and seamless experience.

    The New York City Marathon has grown from a Central Park race with 55 finishers tothe world's biggest and most popular marathon, with more than 50,000 finishers in 2017. Get ready for Sunday, November 4, the day of the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon. Whether you're a runner, spectator, or fan, the information here will help you plan your day.

    The TCS New York City Marathon course runs 26.2 miles through the five boroughs of NYC and is a model for big-city marathons around the world. On November 4, it will move you!

    The one-month window to apply for general entry or claim guaranteed entry to the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon will be January 14 February 14, 2019, followed by an entry drawing on February 27, 2019.

    Reviews
    • Did the event in 2018

      This was my first time running NYC. After missing out on the lottery every year...including 2018...I won a bib to the 2018 race. It was a special race and a great experience. There’s so much energy in the City.
      The pre race transportation is excellent. There were plenty of aid stations. Definitely get the poncho. My only complaint was that we had to take the subway back to the hotel and boy was it hard to make it down that many stairs!
    • Did the event in 2018

      The NYC marathon is quite an experience. If you like the big marathon spectacle, I highly recommend it. The Expo: The expo is mostly well organized. It's at the Javitz center, which is at the far western edge of 34st. It's not terribly easy to get to, so plan some time to get there and back. Getting your bib and race packet is very well organized. There is separate station at the expo to try on shirt sizes before going to choose one. Plus the race t-shirt is a long sleeve. I thought it was a bit confusing having to go through the New Balance store to get to the other vendors. But the variety of vendors at the expo was pretty good. Plus, the Javitz center has plenty of place to get food/drink and sit.Getting to the start: I opted for the midtown bus, which was a good idea. It was very well organized by time. The busses leave from front of the library next to Bryant Park but the entrance to the line was at the southwest corner of the park. That added some extra walking for me but it was no big deal. The busses were comfortable and warm. The ride there took about 45 or so minutes. Some of that was waiting to get off the bus at the starting village. It was pretty impressive to me how quickly and efficiently they were able to move that many people to the start.Starting Village: This was another impressive part of the race. The starting village is separated by color group, which is printed on your bib. There is water, coffee, and pre-race nutrition (bagels, bananas, energy bars, etc). There are lots of bathrooms too. They even have them in the start corrals, which is very nice for that last minute need to go before the start. There were lots of bins to discard your warm up clothes and attendants there to help you. The start corrals were well organized and pace groups were easy to find. Once at the start, there is so much excitement.The course: The initial ascent on the Verrazano is not bad at all since it is at the beginning. The descent is a little hard to control your pace on though, so be aware of that if you're pacing. The views of lower Manhattan from the bridge are like nothing else on the course. The energy in Brooklyn and Queens is remarkable. There are so many cheering throughout and I hardly recall any spots where it was empty. That said, I highly recommend sticking close to a pacer at your desired pace during this stretch. The energy can make you want to run a little faster. After Queens is a near two mile stretch along the Queensboro bridge. It doesn't seem like much, but at mile 16 the steady ascent of it can be really hard and it's really quiet. You'll get on the other side it and the race energy returns as you go steadily up First Avenue. You'll welcome it after getting off the bridge. The energy on that street and into Harlem are amazing. The jaunt through the Bronx is pretty quite but there are lot of people cheering. The last stretch down 5th avenue and back in the park is mostly downhill with a few bumps. The park is mostly flat, though the final stretch down Central Park South is slightly uphill towards the end. Then there is the last bit through the park and then you're done. It's a thrilling feeling to finish the NYC marathon. Post race: After getting your medal, there are plenty of photo opportunities. You can get a heat sheet almost immediately if you need one. The recovery bag had some good items in it, like a protein shake, protein bar, apply, gatorade, pretzels, and water. After finishing, it takes about 30-45 minutes to get out of the park provided you don't have a bag to pick up. The post-race poncho is very nice and very warm. Other thoughts: If you plan to run this race, be sure to set aside a full day. The last busses leave for the start around 7am. Most runners start the race between 10 and 11 and finish sometime in the afternoon. Add to it the time it takes to get out of the park and then find a way back to your hotel. There are aid stations at each mile, which have gatorade and water. Some stops have bananas, bio-freeze, and one has energy gels. Overall, the race is very well organized and well executed. And they treat the runners very well.
    • Did the event in 2018

      Before October 2018, I hadn't run a marathon with over 9,000 entrants, let alone a world major. The 2018 edition of the NYC Marathon became my second massive race, in a month. My only frame of reference to this is the Chicago Marathon, and New York did some things better, and some things not as good. Here we go.I stayed in Queens for Marathon weekend, although there are no shortage of places to stay in New York City. Some would be closer to the start, finish, or shuttles for sure, but I went for cost effective. The weekend really starts with the expo, and I was about a 20 minute train ride away directly to the convention center. Perfect.I got to the expo early on Saturday morning, since I was also manning a booth. Lines already began to form before it opened at 9, but they were very organized and moved very quickly. There is security, so if you are bringing a bag that might take some extra time. The check in process is super quick: grab your bib, go down to grab your shirt, and then head through the official merch area to get into the rest of the expo. I really liked the flow of the New York expo, and it didn't require you to weave through the exhibitors to get your bib and/or shirt.And let's talk about the shirt. I love it! I had been told be fellow BibRavers who had run NYC in the past that the race shirt was very good. And it was! This year, the shirt was a dark blue (like almost every race shirt in 2018 it seemed), and long sleeve with the logo on it. I'm a big fan. Obviously, if you want more NYC merch, pick some up at the expo, or grab the race jacket like I did.Fast forward to race morning. I had elected to take the ferry to Staten Island, and due to getting into the race late, I only had the option of the 5:30 ferry. So yes, it was an early morning. I was warned there would be no coffee at the start village (there was) but fortunately, there was coffee at the ferry to get to the island. So if you need your coffee fix before running, you're set if you take this option. There's security at the ferry as well, but just make sure you aren't bringing anything illegal and that you use the clear bag the race gives you.The ferry ride is mostly uneventful, as it's literally a boat of runners chatting about their life and the race. The views of the harbor were pretty neat, since my ferry caught the sunrise over the city. After getting off the ferry, we walk through the terminal (or whatever you want to call where the ferry docks) and back outside over to the bus that takes you to the start area. It was a little chilly in the morning, but being on the first ferry meant my line moved pretty quick. Still, it took about two hours to get to the start village.Once at the start village, there's more security to clear before going to your assigned color. Runners are either Green, Orange, or Blue waves. The start village has food, coffee, bag check, bathrooms, and some cheap but comfortable Dunkin hats. The big hurdle here was killing time. I had about 3 hours before race start.Fast forward to the corral. The race is strict about getting into your corral, and you get a 35 minute window to do so. You can keep your throwaways on all this time, as there are donation boxes to toss them in the corral. There are also bathrooms in the corral. Clutch.Once the corrals close, runners begin their walk to the bridge and to the start. I didn't expect that, but you walk another solid half mile before lining up to start the race. I checked my watch in the start area and had already accumulated about 4 miles worth of walking in the morning. And no, the race wasn't started yet.Once the race gets going, congestion is more of an issue than I experienced at Chicago (it should be noted I started further back at NYC). The Green wave runs the bottom of the first bridge while Orange and Blue run the top before splitting. All three waves run a bit different the first 5k before coming back together in Brooklyn. Much like Chicago spends almost the entire first half on the north side, New York spends almost the entire first half in Brooklyn. But it's worth it. The hills are minimal here, and the crowds are spectacular. Queens comes next, but only for a few miles before ascending the iconic (for the race at least) Queensboro Bridge. Be ready for this ascent, and then descent into Manhattan. The crowds going up 1st Ave are spectacular again, but the key word is "up" 1st Ave. The second half of the race is where the hills take hold. First Ave is gradual ups and downs, and you still have bridges into the Bronx and Harlem to go. After getting through Harlem, runners take on 5th Ave, and an absolute grinder of a hill before entering into Central Park. While Central Park is mostly downhill, there are some tricky uphill segments here as well. You'll briefly exit the park to masses of crowds before coming back in for the iconic finish.Once you finish, be prepared to walk. Regardless of if you go with the poncho option or the gear check option (this is what I did) it's almost a mile walk to the end of the finisher's chute. Then it's another walk out of the park. Fortunately, the chute spits you out right by the subway. That means stairs, but also easy commuting since there's a zero percent chance of getting a cab or Uber anywhere near the finish.The only negative I had about the race was actually the Aid Stations. Not that the Aid Stations were bad, not at all; in fact the volunteers at NYC are AMAZING. But I've never seen so many runners WALK through the AS right next to the volunteers. It makes it incredibly hard to grab something. At Chicago it's preached to grab and go, but apparently not at New York.All in all, running the NYC Marathon was an incredible experience. I liked it way more than Chicago in terms of the experience of a world major. Although, with the crowds of runners, I'm not 100% certain I'd want it as a goal race. That being said, there are a lot of things I would do differently leading into the race had I been planning to run for time.If you get the chance, run the NYC Marathon. Do it.
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    $35 - $105
    Details

    Two Cities Marathon & Half

    Yosemite Rd, Fresno, CA 93720, USAView event
    About the event

    Take your pick of a marathon and two half marathons across Fresno and Clovis. Runners of all stripes will enjoy the half marathons, and the pan-flat marathon is ideal for PR chasers. Come for goodies galore (pullover, t-shirt, medal) and enjoy the post-race Michelob Ultra beer garden.

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About Let's Do This

Discover epic challenges with Let’s Do This. Whether it’s running, triathlon, cycling or obstacles, Let’s Do This will help you find the best endurance events in the world.

About Marathons in the United States

With the biggest crowds and magnificent cityscapes, marathons make up some of the most spectacular races held in the United States. People run marathons (or 26.2 miles) for many different reasons from a personal challenge to a public cause. What's consistent is the determination that brings everyone together to push through to the finish. The Boston Marathon alone has raised over $297 million for charity since 1986, and with an average time of 3h44m it is the fastest marathon in the United States.

What are the best marathons?

Top of the list is the Boston Marathon, the oldest annual marathon in the world and one of the six World Marathon Majors, attracting over 500,000 spectators. If you're thinking of participating, Chicago Marathon and Twin Cities Marathon both have reputations for being fast courses and will provide you with the best chance to run a qualifying time. There are many more fantastic marathons throughout the US, the LA Marathon, Walt Disney World Marathon, New York Marathon, Marine Corps Marathon and the Houston Marathon are all big races and run through October to March.

How long will it take me to run a marathon?

The world record for women was set, in London, by Paula Radcliffe of Great Britain in 2003 at 2h15m25s minutes and is proving tough to beat. The men's record was beaten in Berlin in 2018 by Eliud Kipchoge and at 2h01m39s is pushing close to breaking the elusive 2 hour barrier.

The average time to finish the Boston marathon is 3h44m. This is significantly faster than the global average of around 4h13m for men and 4h42m for women. Don't focus too much on what others are doing, keep your own pace and don't worry if you are overtaken by Superman, he is super after all. It is worth pointing out that finishing times are greatly affected by the course. Some marathons are particularly fast (e.g. A1A, Phoenix), and the average time for different marathons can vary - it's best to check our course descriptions for each race to get a better understanding of finishing times.

How do you train for a marathon?

Training for a marathon takes a lot of motivation. Make sure you carve out time in your busy schedule to train, you can download our free 16 week training plan, with nutrition and race tips included. Regardless of whether you're entering your first race or looking to hit a new PR, we recommend around 16 weeks as the right time frame to prepare you for a marathon.