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Hardrock 100

Run 100mi

Ticket information

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The Hardrock Hundred Mile Endurance Run is an ultramarathon of 100.5 miles in length, plus 33,050 feet of climb and 33,050 feet of descent for a total elevation change of 66,100 feet, at an average elevation of over 11,000 feet. The run is held on a loop course on 4WD roads, dirt trails, and cross country in Southern Colorado's San Juan Range, USA.

How to enter the Hardrock 100

  1. 100 Miles

    Run 100mi

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Hardrock 100 route

The HARDROCK 100 is a mountain run that passes through some of the most beautiful and rugged mountains in the world.

The course is closed. That means that runners are required to follow the specified route.

Four legs, linking the Lake City, Ouray, Telluride, and Silverton areas. The finish is in Silverton, the same location as the start. The course is 100 miles long, has a cumulative vertical gain of 33,050 feet of climb and 33,050 feet of descent for a total elevation change of 66,100 feet, and takes place at an average elevation of about 11,000 feet. The high point is 14,048 feet.

This is a test of runners against the mountains. The course is on trails as much as possible. There are 15 aid stations; major aid stations will be located in the towns with less well-equipped aid stations in between. Runners are expected to be largely self-supporting between the towns.

This is not an orienteering event. We intend that you be able to concentrate primarily on running. However, remoteness, weather, animals, and people problems on the course make this problematic at best. We will mark the entire course before the run. However, long road sections and maintained trails may not be marked at all. Cross-country sections will be marked more intensely. We shall continue our trend over the past few years of less intense course marking with fewer flags along all course sections. The flags should be readily visible, even to those with red/green color blindness. The markers have reflective tags for night visibility. On some portions of the route we may place colored engineer tape. Chalk may be used to mark other sections, particularly roads in towns. Runners are responsible for knowing the prescribed course and following it whether or not markers are present.

The altitude range of this run (7,700 to 14,000+ feet) takes the runner through several climate zones. At the lower altitude, forests of aspen, pine, and spruce are common. Timberline is locally at about 11,800 feet, though this can vary greatly. Above timberline is alpine tundra and low vegetation interspersed with krummholz (low, stunted spruce, fir, and willow).

In the summer, animal life is abundant. You will almost certainly see elk in the high meadows, possibly with their young. Stay clear of elk: they can be ornery at times. Bears (black, not grizzlies) are present, though seldom seen. Mountain lions may also be encountered.

The run is a salute to the toughness and perseverance of the hardrock miners who lived and worked in the area.

Event Details

Volunteers

Welcome to the Hardrock 100 Endurance Run! If you have any special talents such as Emergency Medical training, you love to cook in the backcountry, have an amateur radio license, are a good computer operator, or anything else; let us know so we can make best use of your time and energy.

One of our biggest hopes is that you will have a fun, rewarding experience and want to come back year after year.

The various Directors for Hardrock each work to recruit their own volunteers, but the easiest way to get connected is by filling out the Volunteer Form. All Directors have access to this master list, and can easily see your profile to recruit you for the role(s) you show interest in.

The backcountry nature of Hardrock lends significant authority to the volunteers on the spot for any questions. Please try to solve problems locally, but use the radio network to contact your Director or the Run Director when local solutions don't seem to be working out.

We would very much like to make use of the experience you gain this year, so please provide any feedback about how to improve the Hardrock or its organization to Volunteer Director Brad Bishop.

FAQs

What is the cut-off time?

The cut-off time for finishing the run is 48 hours. Current fastest performances are held by Kilian Jornet (22:41), set in 2014 and Diana Finkel (27:18), set in 2009. The average time required to finish this run is 40:23:42, which is longer than the cutoff times of most 100-mile (160 km) races. This is due largely to the high elevations, which can cause altitude sickness or edema in some runners. In addition, the course covers extremely rugged terrain including steep scree climbs and descents, snow packs, river crossings, and boulder fields. The run starts at 6am, so runners who finish in over 40 hours see the sun set twice before finishing. Runners continue at night using flashlights or headlamps. Portions of the trail are adjacent to steep dropoffs and are described in the course description with the word "exposure".

Hardrock 100 weather forecast

Clear throughout the day.

73°F
Predicted highs
54°F
Predicted lows
IconLight breeze possible, up to 5mph

Meet the organizer

Organizer's website

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